Year: 2015

What You Can’t See May Indeed Hurt You: A Historical Analysis of Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder

Anthony Mack is a third year Biological Chemistry major at Grinnell College. When not in class, he enjoys playing baseball and is one of the captains of Grinnell’s baseball team. After Grinnell, Anthony plans on attending a college of pharmacy where he would work toward obtaining his PharmD. When a war ends, we are continuously… Read more What You Can’t See May Indeed Hurt You: A Historical Analysis of Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder

Autonomous and Insane: The Gendered, Classed, and Raced Pathologization of Women’s Minds

Johanna Foster is a senior sociology major at Grinnell College in Grinnell, Iowa. Her post-graduation plans involve working in education and the consumption of copious amounts of coffee. Modern pop culture loves to pathologize women’s behavior. Does this seem like a questionable assertion? A quick dive into the murky waters of the popular website, urbandictionary.com,… Read more Autonomous and Insane: The Gendered, Classed, and Raced Pathologization of Women’s Minds

“Everything in Nature goes in curves and circles”: Native American Concepts of Disability

Marisa Leib-Neri is a second year Independent major in Disability Studies. She is fascinated by different cultural conceptions of disability and how disability, health, medicine, and wellness are historically intertwined. Her hobbies include tennis, violin, and re-watching every season of Parks and Recreation. The modern view of reality is based in straight lines and angles.… Read more “Everything in Nature goes in curves and circles”: Native American Concepts of Disability

Prozac and Depression: A History of Opposing Theories

Connor Mulligan is an undergraduate Chemistry Major at Grinnell College who has an interest in psychiatric medicine. In an era of evidence-based medical practice, psychiatry is falling behind. Treatment options and the theories behind them have retained a few common threads for the last two hundred years, but most have varied widely. Other medical specialties… Read more Prozac and Depression: A History of Opposing Theories

Trickle-Down Addiction

by Patrick Dowd Between 1999 and 2010, sales of opioid analgesics like Vicodin, Percocet, and OxyContin, quadrupled in the United States [1]. Overdose deaths have increased proportionately during the same timespan, with more Americans dying from prescription opioid overdoses than from heroin and cocaine overdoses combined [2]. Still, the distinction between prescription and illicit drugs… Read more Trickle-Down Addiction

An Increase in the Mind-Body Interaction in Healthcare: The Importance of Yoga

Ashley E. Murphy is currently a second year student at Grinnell College. She is majoring in Biology with a concentration in Environmental Studies. She selected this blog post topic because she is interested in complementary and alternative healing pathways within medicine. In her free time, she enjoys waterskiing and looking up funny YouTube videos of… Read more An Increase in the Mind-Body Interaction in Healthcare: The Importance of Yoga

“Frailty, Danger, and Isolation”: Turn-of-the Century America and the Pathologization of Old Age

Meredith Carroll is a rising senior at Grinnell College, where she studies history, plays flute, and braves the Iowa climate as a campus tour guide. Her interests include the history of the popularization of science and its intersections with the history of the book. She can regularly be found ensconced in Grinnell’s Burling Library, with… Read more “Frailty, Danger, and Isolation”: Turn-of-the Century America and the Pathologization of Old Age